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This weekend is far more interesting than I originally thought it would be. Not only did I not expect to see Boston College in the GLI third-place game, but when the Eagles lost yesterday, I fully expected them to score more than they did in today’s consolation game against Michigan Tech. Today’s game was the third in a row that the Eagles’ eighth-best offense in the country — averaging more than 3.5 goals per game coming into this weekend — was kept to two goals per game.

They’re good, or at least Jerry York hopes they are

Heading into this consolation game, York said he prepped his team by reminding them that the game counted toward the PairWise Rankings. He also said that he suspects that MTU will continue to improve as the season progressed, rising in the PWR.

I asked York if he was now also rooting for Michigan, given yesterday’s loss. He smiled and said that, yes, he’s a Wolverines fan for the rest of the season — and a Spartans fan, given that BC beat MSU 5-2 to open their 2011-12 season.

No hard feelings

With 28.9 seconds left in regulation, BC up 2-1 and MTU’s goaltender, Josh Robinson, pulled for the extra skater, Blake Pietila knocked a rebound in past BC’s Parker Milner and appeared to have tied the game. After a lengthy review, the official determined that the puck had come to Pietila off the high stick of another Huskies player.

That’s the way it goes, said MTU coach Mel Pearson.

Pearson ended his post-game press conference wishing for a better fate for his players, who worked hard all weekend and came away with nothing to show for it.

Small school, big spirit

Every year, Michigan Tech brings the most spirited student pep band to the GLI — and if you saw yesterday’s blog of the opening game, you know there’s a certain dog that brings his own charm to the building, too.

Bands aren’t allowed to play enough at these events, with the venues piping in recorded music far too often. There were many chants of, “Less canned, more band!” from the MTU fans in the Huskies’ band corner. After a solid 13 minutes of promotions and recorded music between the second and third periods, the MTU band was allowed to play. Here’s how they did it.